1986 Atlantic hurricane season

1986 Atlantic Hurricane Season

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1986 Atlantic hurricane season

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<!-- Created with subst: of Hurricane season single. -->The 1986 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1986, and lasted until November 30, 1986. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. During the 1986 season, the first subtropical depression formed in the first week of June, while the last tropical cyclone dissipated at the end of the third week of November. The 1986 season had lower than average activity because of an ongoing El NiƱo event, and was the least active season in the North Atlantic since the 1983 Atlantic hurricane season. This was also the first season since 1972 to have no major hurricanes. Earl was the strongest hurricane of the season, reaching Category 2 status. Few storms caused significant damage; Hurricane Bonnie caused heavy rains and flooding across southeast Texas when it made landfall near Sea Rim State Park. Hurricane Charley caused limited damage in North Carolina and Massachusetts, but crossed the Atlantic as an extratropical cyclone and caused considerable damage in Ireland and Great Britain.

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Seasonal forecast and summary

Dr. William M. Gray of Colorado State University issued forecasts on May 29 and July 28 indicating within both forecasts the anticipation of a below normal hurricane season. In May, a total of 8 named tropical storms were expected, with four...
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