Carucate

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Description:
The carucate (, from carrūca, "wheeled plough") or ploughland (, "plough's land") was a unit of assessment for tax used in most Danelaw counties of England, and is found for example in Domesday Book. The carucate was based on the area a plough team of eight oxen could till in a single annual season. It was sub-divided into oxgangs, or "bovates", based on the area a single ox might till in the same period, which thus represented one eighth of a carucate; and it was analogous to the hide, a unit of tax assessment used outside the Danelaw counties. Though a carucate might nominally be regarded as an area of 120 acres (490,000 m²), and can usefully be compared to the hide, the true picture is vastly more complex: see e.g. Stenton, F.M., 'Introduction', in Foster, C.W. & Longley, T. (eds.), The Lincolnshire Domesday and the Lindsey Survey, Lincoln Record Society, XIX, 1924, especially pp. ix-xix.

The tax levied on each carucate came to be known as "carucage".

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