Independent clause

Independent Clause

Independent clause

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Description:
An independent clause (or main clause) is a clause that can stand by itself, also known as a simple sentence. An independent clause contains a subject and a predicate; it makes sense by itself.

Multiple independent clauses can be joined by using a semicolon or a comma plus a coordinating conjunction (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so).

Examples

  • I love penguins. (simple sentence)
  • I drive a bus. (simple sentence)
  • I am a doctor, and my wife is a lawyer. (compound sentence made up of two independent clauses: I am a doctor and my wife is a lawyer)
  • I want to be a nurse, but I need to receive my science degree. (compound sentence made up of two independent clauses:
(''I want to be a nurse'')<br>
(''I need to receive my science degree'')
  • Go to the store, and get me a carton of milk. (compound sentence) (Though a subject is not visible, in English the subject of an imperative is considered to be the pronoun 'you')


See also



References



External links

  • The Tongue Untied:
  • Owl Online Writing Lab:
  • Independent Clauses - Dependent Clauses - Elementary Grammar Lessons & Tests - My Schoolhouse - Online Learning:





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