Town and gown

to get instant updates about 'Town And Gown' on your MyPage. Meet other similar minded people. Its Free!

X 

All Updates


Description:
Town and gown are two distinct communities of a university town; "town" being the non-academic population and "gown" metonymically being the university community, especially in ancient seats of learning such as Oxford, Cambridge, Durham and St Andrews, although the term is also used to describe modern university towns. The metaphor is historical in its connotation but continues to be used in the literature on urban higher education and in common parlance.

Origin of the term



During the Middle Ages, students admitted to the European universities often held minor clerical status and donned garb similar to that worn by the clergy. These vestments evolved into the academic long black gown, worn along with hood and cap. The gown proved comfortable for studying in unheated and drafty buildings and thus became a tradition in the universities. The gown also served as a social symbol, as it was impractical for physical manual work . The hood was often adorned with the colours of the colleges and designated the young scholar's university affiliation. Thus by their distinctive clothing, the students were set apart and distinguished from the citizens of the town; hence the phrase "town and gown."

Town and gown in the Middle Ages

The university as sanctuary

The idea of a school of higher learning as a distinct and autonomous institution within an urban setting dates back to the Academy founded by Plato c. 387 BC. The Academy was established as a...
Read More

No feeds found

All
Posting your question. Please wait!...


No updates available.
No messages found
Tell your friends >
about this page
 Create a new Page
for companies, colleges, celebrities or anything you like.Get updates on MyPage.
Create a new Page
 Find your friends
  Find friends on MyPage from