Voiceless labial-velar plosive

Voiceless Labial-Velar Plosive

IPA
IPA Less

Voiceless labial-velar plosive

to get instant updates about 'Voiceless Labial-Velar Plosive' on your MyPage. Meet other similar minded people. Its Free!

X 

All Updates


Description:
The voiceless labial–velar plosive is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. It is a and pronounced simultaneously. To make this sound, say Coe, but close your lips as if you were saying Poe; release your lips at the same times as or a fraction of a second after you pronounce the C of Coe. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is .

The voiceless labial–velar plosive is found in Vietnamese and various languages in West and Central Africa. In Yoruba it is written with a simple ‹p›.

Features

Features of the voiceless labial–velar plosive:



Occurrence



Similar sounds

Some languages, especially in Papua New Guinea and in Vanuatu, combine this voiceless labial–velar plosive with a labial–velar approximant release, hence . Thus Mwotlap (Banks Islands, north Vanuatu) has ('my father-in-law').

In the Banks Islands languages which have it, the phoneme is written in local orthographies.In other languages of Vanuatu further south (such as South Efate, or Lenakel), the same segment is spelled .

See also



References



Bibliography







          • ...
          • ...
          ...
        • ...
        ...
      • ...
      ...
    • ...
    ...
  • ...

Read More

No feeds found

All
wait Posting your question. Please wait!...


About

IPA
No messages found
Tell your friends >
about this page
 Create a new Page
for companies, colleges, celebrities or anything you like.Get updates on MyPage.
Create a new Page
 Find your friends
  Find friends on MyPage from