Yaksha

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Yaksha ( , yakkha,For yakkha as a "rare use in Pali" see Franklin Edgerton, Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Grammar and Dictionary, vol. 2., Motilal Banarsidass, First Edition, 1953, p. 442. yaksa, Korean: 야차/夜叉 yacha, Japanese: 夜叉 yasha, Chinese: 夜叉 yèchā or yaochā, ba-lu, Tibetan: <span lang="bo">གནོད་སྦྱིན་</span> gnod sbyin) is the name of a broad class of nature-spirits, usually benevolent, who are caretakers of the natural treasures hidden in the earth and tree roots. They appear in Hindu, Jain and Buddhist mythology. The feminine form of the word is ()For as the feminine of see V. S. Apte, The Practical Sanskrit-English Dictionary, p. 776. or Yakshini ( (),For yakṣiṇī () as a regular Sanskrit term for a female yakṣa, and yakṣaṇī as a Buddhist variant, see Franklin Edgerton, Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Grammar and Dictionary, vol. 2., Motilal Banarsidass, First Edition, 1953, p. 442. Pāli: yakkhī () or yakkhiṇī ()).

In Hindu, Jain, and Buddhist mythology, the has a dual personality. On the one hand, a may be an inoffensive nature-fairy, associated with woods and mountains; but there is also a darker version of the , which is a kind of ghost (bhuta) that haunts the wilderness and waylays and devours travelers, similar to the .

In Kālidāsa's poem Meghadūta, for...
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