Passenger car (rail)

Passenger Car (Rail)

Passenger car (rail)

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Description:
This article is about railroad equipment. For other cars, see Automobile and wiktionary definition of passenger car.
A passenger car (known as a coach or carriage in the UK, and also known as a bogie in India) is a piece of railway rolling stock that is designed to carry passengers. The term passenger car can also be associated with a sleeping car, baggage, dining and railway post office cars.

History

19th century: First passenger cars and early development



Up until about the end of the 19th century, most passenger cars were constructed of wood. The first passenger trains did not travel very far, but they were able to haul many more passengers for a longer distance than any wagons pulled by horses.

As railways were first constructed in England, so too were the first passenger cars. One of the early coach designs was the "Stanhope". It featured a roof and small holes in the floor for drainage when it rained, and had separate compartments for different classes of travel. The only problem with this design is that the passengers were expected to stand for their entire trip. The first passenger cars in the United States resembled stagecoaches. They were short, often less than 10 ft (3 m) long and had two axles.

British railways had a little bit of a head start on American railroads, with the first "bed-carriage" (an early sleeping car) being built there...
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