Sunderland Minster

Sunderland Minster

UK Feature
UK Feature Less

Sunderland Minster

to get instant updates about 'Sunderland Minster' on your MyPage. Meet other similar minded people. Its Free!

X 

All Updates


Description:
Sunderland Minster Church of St. Michaels and All Angels (commonly known as Sunderland Minster) is a church in Sunderland city centre, England. It was known as St. Michael's Church, serving the parish of Bishopwearmouth, but was renamed on 11 January 1998 in recognition of Sunderland's city status. In May 2007 the Minister ceased to act as the parish church of Bishopwearmouth. It is one of the Greater Churches.

History

The parish of Bishopwearmouth, south of the River Wear was founded in around 940AD, with an original stone church being built shortly afterwards. The first evidence of a church on the site arose in a 1930s excavation when Saxon stones were found. Due to colliery subsidence, the church was virtually re-built beyond recognition in the early 20th century.

At present, Canon Stephen Taylor oversees the running of the Minster.

Role of the Minster

Until May 2007 the team of ministers carried out traditional parish duties as well as serving the city by hosting services of remembrance, providing chaplaincies for the retail and industrial workforces in the city centre, as well as being used by the University chaplaincy. It plays host to special services and worship events for the whole city. In 2007 the Minster ended its parish role, and these functions were transferred to the Parish Church of St Nicholas. Since then the Minster describes itself as "A church for the whole City".

There is a small gift shop selling fairtrade products and a clock tower café...
Read More

No feeds found

All
Posting your question. Please wait!...


About

UK Feature
No messages found
Suggested Pages
Tell your friends >
about this page
 Create a new Page
for companies, colleges, celebrities or anything you like.Get updates on MyPage.
Create a new Page
 Find your friends
  Find friends on MyPage from